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Weekly Summary -- May 24, 2019

Friday, May. 24, 2019 (Pharmacist's Briefing) -- Here are what Pharmacist's Briefing editors consider the most important developments for the week of May 24, 2019

Open Communication Helps Teens Manage Type 1 Diabetes

FRIDAY, May 23, 2019 (Pharmacist's Briefing) -- It's a simple concept, but new research reinforces the idea: Teens with type 1 diabetes benefit when they feel their concerns have been heard.

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Good Blood Pressure, Blood Sugar Levels Can Prevent 'Heart Block'

FRIDAY, May 24, 2019 (Pharmacist's Briefing) -- Keeping blood pressure and blood sugar levels under control might prevent a common heart rhythm disorder called "heart block."

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Who's Most Likely to Miss School Due to Eczema?

FRIDAY, May 24, 2019 (Pharmacist's Briefing) -- Hispanic and black children are more likely to miss school than white children due to the chronic skin condition eczema, a new study finds.

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Many 'Dehumanize' People with Obesity

THURSDAY, May 23, 2019 (Pharmacist's Briefing) -- Many people -- including those who are overweight themselves -- view people with obesity as less human or less evolved, new research reveals.

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Blood Banks Could Help Screen for Hereditary High Cholesterol

WEDNESDAY, May 22, 2019 (Pharmacist's Briefing) -- More than 1 million Americans have a genetic condition that pushes their cholesterol to dangerously high levels, but many don't know it.

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Rising Rx Drug Costs Continue to Create Tough Choices for Seniors

WEDNESDAY, May 22, 2019 (Pharmacist's Briefing) -- A solid minority of senior citizens still struggles to afford their prescription medications, a new government report shows.

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How Does Room Temperature Affect Test Scores?

WEDNESDAY, May 22, 2019 (Pharmacist's Briefing) -- If you're taking a test, you might want to check the thermostat first.

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Kids of Opioid-Using Parents May Be More Likely to Attempt Suicide

WEDNESDAY, May 22, 2019 (Pharmacist's Briefing) -- Children of parents who use opioids have more than double the risk of attempted suicide, a new study finds.

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COPD May Strike Women Harder Than Men

WEDNESDAY, May 22, 2019 (Pharmacist's Briefing) -- Women with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) appear to have a harder time than men with the progressive lung disorder, a new study suggests.

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Fewer Deaths Tied to Dirty Air, But Threats Persist: Report

WEDNESDAY, May 22, 2019 (Pharmacist's Briefing) -- Significant but uneven improvements in air quality have greatly reduced U.S. deaths related to air pollution over the past decade, a new study shows.

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Are DIY Sunscreens Dangerous?

TUESDAY, May 21, 2019 (Pharmacist's Briefing) -- Interest in homemade sunscreens is hot, but many of these do-it-yourself brews lack effective sun protection, a new study warns.

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Diet for Blood Pressure May Also Reduce Heart Failure Risk

TUESDAY, May 21, 2019 (Pharmacist's Briefing) -- The DASH diet's mission is to fight high blood pressure. But a new study suggests that the eating plan may also significantly lower the risk of heart failure in people younger than 75.

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AHA News: Potentially Fatal Buildup of Proteins in the Heart Often Goes Undiagnosed

TUESDAY, May 21, 2019 (American Heart Association News) -- A potentially fatal buildup of abnormal proteins in the heart and other organs is being delayed in its diagnosis and undertreated -- despite new drugs that can combat it, a new study suggests.

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For Many With Mild Asthma, Popular Rx May Not Work: Study

TUESDAY, May 21, 2019 (Pharmacist's Briefing) -- A widely used type of asthma medication may not work in more than half of patients who are prescribed it, new research shows.

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Could CBD Treat Opioid Addiction?

TUESDAY, May 21, 2019 (Pharmacist's Briefing) -- Cannabidiol (CBD) has been receiving a lot of attention lately as a potential treatment for everything from epilepsy to anxiety. Now, researchers report it might also help curb the cravings that come with opioid addiction.

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Crash Risk Much Higher for Teen Drivers With ADHD

MONDAY, May 20, 2019 (Pharmacist's Briefing) -- Parents often fret when their teen drivers get behind the wheel, but parents of teens with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) may now have added worries.

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Vaping Habit Might Make You More Prone to Flu

MONDAY, May 20, 2019 (Pharmacist's Briefing) -- Steering clear of folks who are coughing and sneezing is one way to prevent catching the flu. Avoiding e-cigarettes may be another, new research suggests.

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Migraines in Pregnancy Tied to Worse Outcomes for Mother, Baby

FRIDAY, May 24, 2019 (Pharmacist's Briefing) -- Migraines in pregnant women are associated with an increased risk for pregnancy-associated hypertension disorders as well as an increased risk for a variety of adverse outcomes in the newborn, according to a study published online May 8 in Headache.

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LDL Decreased With LDL-Apheresis in ACS Patients

FRIDAY, May 24, 2019 (Pharmacist's Briefing) -- Removal of low-density lipoproteins (LDL) by extracorporeal filtration during LDL-apheresis (LDL-A) is associated with a large reduction in mean LDL in acute coronary syndrome (ACS) patients treated with percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), according to a study presented at the annual meeting of the Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions, held from May 19 to 20 in Las Vegas.

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Obstructive Sleep Apnea Linked to Cancer Diagnosis in Women

FRIDAY, May 24, 2019 (Pharmacist's Briefing) -- Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is associated with cancer diagnosis, especially among women, according to a research letter published online May 20 in the European Respiratory Journal.

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Women With COPD Have Worse QoL, Increased Symptom Burden

THURSDAY, May 23, 2019 (Pharmacist's Briefing) -- Compared with men, women with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) have reduced respiratory-specific and general quality of life (QoL) and are more likely to be symptomatic, according to a study presented at the American Thoracic Society 2019 International Conference, held from May 17 to 22 in Dallas.

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CDC: Cancer Death Rates Decreased, Heart Disease Deaths Rose

THURSDAY, May 23, 2019 (Pharmacist's Briefing) -- Cancer death rates declined for adults aged 45 to 64 years from 1999 to 2017, while heart disease death rates decreased to 2011 and then increased, according to the May 22 National Vital Statistics Reports, a publication from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

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Bystander Resuscitation Attempted Less Often for Women in Cardiac Arrest

WEDNESDAY, May 22, 2019 (Pharmacist's Briefing) -- In out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA), women are less often resuscitated than men, and they have lower survival rates with resuscitation, according to a study published online May 21 in the European Heart Journal.

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Incidence of Parkinson Disease Increased in Bipolar Disorder

WEDNESDAY, May 22, 2019 (Pharmacist's Briefing) -- Patients with bipolar disorder (BD) have an increased incidence of Parkinson disease (PD), according to a study published online May 22 in Neurology.

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Targeted Laser Surgery Treats Temporal Lobe Epilepsy

WEDNESDAY, May 22, 2019 (Pharmacist's Briefing) -- Laser interstitial thermal therapy (LITT) targeting greater amygdala volume is more likely to be associated with Engel I outcomes for mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (mTLE), according to a study published online May 21 in Epilepsia.

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Closed ICU Model May Reduce Hospital-Acquired Infections

WEDNESDAY, May 22, 2019 (Pharmacist's Briefing) -- A closed intensive care unit (ICU) model, whereby a patient is evaluated and admitted under an intensivist and orders involving patient care are written by the ICU team, is associated with a reduction in certain types of hospital-acquired infections, according to a study presented at the American Thoracic Society 2019 International Conference, held from May 17 to 22 in Dallas.

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Non-Rx Fentanyl Up in Urine Tests Positive for Other Drugs

TUESDAY, May 21, 2019 (Pharmacist's Briefing) -- An increasing number of urine drug test (UDT) results positive for cocaine or methamphetamine are also positive for nonprescribed fentanyl, according to a study recently published in JAMA Network Open.

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Fracture Risk Tool Useful for Women on Aromatase Inhibitors

TUESDAY, May 21, 2019 (Pharmacist's Briefing) -- The FRAX fracture risk tool can stratify fracture risk equally well among women receiving aromatase inhibitor (AI) therapy for breast cancer and nonusers of AI therapy, according to a study published online May 9 in the Journal of Bone and Mineral Research.

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Postoperative Infection Rate Similar Across Biologics in RA

MONDAY, May 20, 2019 (Pharmacist's Briefing) -- For patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) undergoing arthroplasty, the risk for postoperative infection is similar across biologics but is increased with glucocorticoid use, according to a study published online May 21 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Medicaid Expansion Cuts Racial Disparities in Preterm Births

MONDAY, May 20, 2019 (Pharmacist's Briefing) -- Overall, state Medicaid expansion did not significantly impact rates of low birth weight or preterm birth outcomes from 2011 to 2016, but there were significant improvements in disparities for black infants relative to white infants for states that expanded Medicaid versus those that did not, according to a study published in the April 23/30 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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DDW: Ingested Button Battery Can Cause Gastric Injury

MONDAY, May 20, 2019 (Pharmacist's Briefing) -- Ingestion of a button battery (BB) can cause mucosal damage in pediatric patients, even without symptoms, according to a study presented at the 2019 Digestive Disease Week, held from May 18 to 21 in San Diego.

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Statin Use With Colorectal Cancer Lowers Risk for Early Death

FRIDAY, May 24, 2019 (Pharmacist's Briefing) -- Use of statins before or after colorectal cancer (CRC) diagnosis is linked to a lower risk for premature death, from either cancer or other causes, according to a review published online May 8 in Cancer Medicine.

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Intracranial Hemorrhage Risk Up With Low-Dose Aspirin

FRIDAY, May 24, 2019 (Pharmacist's Briefing) -- For individuals without symptomatic cardiovascular disease, the use of low-dose aspirin for primary prevention of cardiovascular events is associated with an increased risk for intracranial hemorrhage, according to a review and meta-analysis published online May 13 in JAMA Neurology.

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Poor Glycemic Control Linked to Sarcopenia in T2DM

FRIDAY, May 24, 2019 (Pharmacist's Briefing) -- For patients with type 2 diabetes, poor glycemic control is associated with sarcopenia, according to a study published online May 9 in the Journal of Diabetes Investigation.

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Blood Donor Screening Data IDs Familial Hypercholesterolemia

THURSDAY, May 23, 2019 (Pharmacist's Briefing) -- Data from a blood donor screening program could represent a novel strategy for identifying familial hypercholesterolemia (FH), according to a study published online May 22 in JAMA Cardiology.

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Classification System Developed for Cardiogenic Shock

THURSDAY, May 23, 2019 (Pharmacist's Briefing) -- A classification system has been developed for categorizing cardiogenic shock; the consensus statement, endorsed by the American College of Cardiology, American Heart Association, Society of Critical Care Medicine, and Society of Thoracic Surgeons, was published online May 19 in Catheterization & Cardiovascular Interventions.

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Early cART Leads to Enhanced T Cell Function in HIV Infection

THURSDAY, May 23, 2019 (Pharmacist's Briefing) -- Early combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) leads to persistent functional T cell responses in most individuals with hyperacute HIV-1 infection, according to a study published online May 22 in Science Translational Medicine.

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Vitamin D Deficiency Tied to Gestational Diabetes Risk

WEDNESDAY, May 22, 2019 (Pharmacist's Briefing) -- Maternal vitamin D deficiency, as early as the first trimester of pregnancy, is associated with an increased risk for gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), according to a study recently published in Diabetes, Obesity and Metabolism.

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Statin Use Reduces Dementia Risk After Concussion in Seniors

TUESDAY, May 21, 2019 (Pharmacist's Briefing) -- Older adults have an increased risk for dementia after concussion, which is modestly reduced among patients using a statin, according to a study published online May 20 in JAMA Neurology.

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Dupilumab Cuts Exacerbations in Late-Onset Asthma

TUESDAY, May 21, 2019 (Pharmacist's Briefing) -- Dupilumab is associated with significantly reduced severe exacerbation rates in patients with late-onset asthma with or without fixed airway obstruction, according to a study presented at the American Thoracic Society 2019 International Conference, held from May 17 to 22 in Dallas.

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Mometasone, Tiotropium Do Not Top Placebo in Mild Asthma

MONDAY, May 20, 2019 (Pharmacist's Briefing) -- For patients with mild asthma with a low sputum eosinophil level, outcomes do not differ significantly for mometasone or tiotropium versus placebo; and budesonide-formoterol is superior to albuterol for prevention of asthma exacerbations, according to two studies published online May 19 in the New England Journal of Medicine. The research was published to coincide with the American Thoracic Society 2019 International Conference, held from May 17 to 22 in Dallas.

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Early Neuromuscular Blockade No Better in ARDS Patients on Vent

MONDAY, May 20, 2019 (Pharmacist's Briefing) -- For patients with moderate-to-severe acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) receiving mechanical ventilation, there is no difference in mortality between those receiving continuous infusion of cisatracurium and those receiving an approach with lighter sedation targets, according to a study published online May 19 in the New England Journal of Medicine. The research was published to coincide with the American Thoracic Society 2019 International Conference, held from May 17 to 22 in Dallas.

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Hormone Therapy in Transgender Women Ups Breast Cancer Risk

MONDAY, May 20, 2019 (Pharmacist's Briefing) -- Transgender women receiving hormone treatments are at greater risk for developing breast cancer than cisgender men, according to a study published online May 15 in The BMJ.

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U.S. Lawmakers Say WHO Opioid Guidelines Too Lax

FRIDAY, May 24, 2019 (Pharmacist's Briefing) -- The World Health Organization's pain care guidelines contain false claims about the safety of prescription opioid painkillers and should be withdrawn, two U.S. lawmakers say.

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Most Patients at High Risk of Opiate Overdose Do Not Receive Naloxone Rx

FRIDAY, May 24, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Patients at high risk of opioid overdose rarely receive prescriptions for naloxone, despite many interactions with the health care system, according to a study published online May 3 in JAMA Network Open.

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California Bill to Tighten Vaccine Exemptions Moves Forward

THURSDAY, May 23, 2019 (Pharmacist's Briefing) -- A bill that would tighten control over vaccination exemptions for children in California was sent by state senators to the Assembly on Wednesday.

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High-Deductible Health Plans May Be Harmful for Patients With COPD

THURSDAY, May 23, 2019 (Pharmacist's Briefing) -- For patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), high-deductible health plans (HDHPs) are associated with increased likelihood of reporting foregoing care because of costs and cost-related nonadherence, according to a study presented at the American Thoracic Society 2019 International Conference, held from May 17 to 22 in Dallas.

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Half-Price Version of Humalog Insulin Now Available

THURSDAY, May 23, 2019 (Pharmacist's Briefing) -- A half-price version of Humalog insulin is now available in the United States, Eli Lilly said Wednesday.

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CDC: Seniors Use Various Strategies to Reduce Rx Costs

WEDNESDAY, May 22, 2019 (Pharmacist's Briefing) -- A proportion of older adults employ strategies to reduce prescription drug costs, according to a May data brief published by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention National Center for Health Statistics.

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Treatment Rates Low for Parents With Opioid Use Disorder

WEDNESDAY, May 22, 2019 (Pharmacist's Briefing) -- Rates of treatment are low for parents with opioid use disorder (OUD) or other substance use disorders (SUDs), according to a study published in the May/June issue of the Annals of Family Medicine.

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Poor Broadband Penetration in Rural Areas Limits Telemedicine

TUESDAY, May 21, 2019 (Pharmacist's Briefing) -- Broadband penetration rates are considerably lower in the most rural counties, especially where access to primary care physicians and psychiatrists is inadequate, according to a study published online May 21 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Racial Disparity Seen in Prescriptions for Buprenorphine

TUESDAY, May 21, 2019 (Pharmacist's Briefing) -- Black patients are less likely to receive a buprenorphine prescription to treat opioid use disorder, according to a research letter published online May 8 in JAMA Psychiatry.

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Clinical Drug Diversion Costly to Health Care Organizations

TUESDAY, May 21, 2019 (Pharmacist's Briefing) -- U.S. health care organizations lost nearly $454 million due to clinical drug diversion in 2018, according to the 2019 Drug Diversion Digest, released by Protenus Inc.

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Private Insurers Pay 241 Percent of What Medicare Would Pay

MONDAY, May 20, 2019 (Pharmacist's Briefing) -- Prices paid to hospitals for privately insured patients in 2017 averaged 241 percent of what Medicare would have paid, with wide variation in prices among states, according to a report published by the RAND Corporation.

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One-Third of Patients on Statins Do Not Reach Target Thresholds

MONDAY, May 20, 2019 (Pharmacist's Briefing) -- More than one-third of patients on statin therapy fail to achieve therapeutic thresholds for low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), according to a study published in the May issue of the Journal of Managed Care & Specialty Pharmacy.

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